Posted 2 years ago
Happy New Year! God Bless!
Posted 2 years ago
High Hopes for 2012

Sorry for the stall in progress. The Amity has faced a significant set back, but hopes to start back strong in the new year. I pray that everyone enjoys the holiday season! God bless :)

Posted 2 years ago

TEDxTeen - Natalie Warne - Anonymous Extraordinaries (by TEDxYouth)

Posted 2 years ago / 16 notes #Somalia #past #BBC News #future
Looking Back

Below is a BBC article from July 2011. Conditions have improved so much since then! 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14248940

Hitting the beach in Mogadishu

Children at the beach in Somalia's capital, Mogadishu (ovember 2011)

For the first time in years, Lido beach in Somalia’s war-town capital, Mogadishu, is packed on Fridays - a day of rest in the Muslim country - as families take advantage of the improved security to enjoy themselves. (From BBC News)

Posted 2 years ago / 12 notes #Somalia #facts #overview
Posted 2 years ago / 4 notes #good news #happy #Somalia
We recently earned our first $4 for Somalia!

A small step in the right direction. Thank you for supporting! Remember, the site earns money when you check out the ads at the top of the page.

Yours,

The Amity

Posted 2 years ago / 177 notes / Via: doctorswithoutborders

doctorswithoutborders:

In 2000, MSF teams in Thailand first provided triple antiretroviral (ARV) therapy to people living with HIV/AIDS. A year later, teams in six other countries followed suit. At the time, a consensus held that treating patients with HIV was too expensive—ARV treatment cost around $10,000 per patient per year—too complicated, too time-consuming.
MSF doctors could not countenance simply offering palliative care and watching patients die, however. They resolved to find a way to provide people living with HIV/AIDS access to the same lifesaving medicines available in wealthier countries. Concurrently, MSF and its Access to Essential Medicines Campaign teamed with AIDS activists to advocate for price reductions in HIV/AIDS medications and against trade barriers threatening production of affordable generics.
The impact has been dramatic. By 2010, MSF was treating 160,000 people with HIV/AIDS in 20 countries—at a cost of around $200 per year per patient—and the international community was backing HIV/AIDS treatment programs once thought untenable. By the end of 2010, 6 million people in developing countries were on antiretroviral treatment, the bulk of it funded by the Global Fund to Fight TB, AIDS, and Malaria and the US government’s President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).
Some 10 million more people still urgently need treatment, but last year, amid the global financial downturn, numerous governments reneged on funding promises to the Global Fund and PEPFAR flat-lined. European trade barriers threatened production of generics in India, the source of 90 percent of the HIV/AIDS medicines used in MSF programs and 80 percent of all ARVs purchased for developing countries.
The progress of the past decade must be protected. “The World Health Organization now recommends early treatment with newer and more robust drugs,” says Sharonann Lynch, the HIV/AIDS policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. “Treatment can both save lives and dramatically reduce the risk of transmission of HIV. MSF is providing this treatment even in places where doctors are few and far between, using trained nurses and peer counselors. A successful model exists, and the science is on our side—now the international community needs to step up to the plate.”
Photo: © Susan Sandars/MSF

doctorswithoutborders:

In 2000, MSF teams in Thailand first provided triple antiretroviral (ARV) therapy to people living with HIV/AIDS. A year later, teams in six other countries followed suit. At the time, a consensus held that treating patients with HIV was too expensive—ARV treatment cost around $10,000 per patient per year—too complicated, too time-consuming.

MSF doctors could not countenance simply offering palliative care and watching patients die, however. They resolved to find a way to provide people living with HIV/AIDS access to the same lifesaving medicines available in wealthier countries. Concurrently, MSF and its Access to Essential Medicines Campaign teamed with AIDS activists to advocate for price reductions in HIV/AIDS medications and against trade barriers threatening production of affordable generics.

The impact has been dramatic. By 2010, MSF was treating 160,000 people with HIV/AIDS in 20 countries—at a cost of around $200 per year per patient—and the international community was backing HIV/AIDS treatment programs once thought untenable. By the end of 2010, 6 million people in developing countries were on antiretroviral treatment, the bulk of it funded by the Global Fund to Fight TB, AIDS, and Malaria and the US government’s President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

Some 10 million more people still urgently need treatment, but last year, amid the global financial downturn, numerous governments reneged on funding promises to the Global Fund and PEPFAR flat-lined. European trade barriers threatened production of generics in India, the source of 90 percent of the HIV/AIDS medicines used in MSF programs and 80 percent of all ARVs purchased for developing countries.

The progress of the past decade must be protected. “The World Health Organization now recommends early treatment with newer and more robust drugs,” says Sharonann Lynch, the HIV/AIDS policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. “Treatment can both save lives and dramatically reduce the risk of transmission of HIV. MSF is providing this treatment
even in places where doctors are few and far between, using trained nurses and peer counselors. A successful model exists, and the science is on our side—now the international community needs to step up to the plate.

Photo: © Susan Sandars/MSF

Posted 2 years ago
kaleid0sc0pic-mind asked “Hey what exactly are you guys trying to accomplish ?”

Our tumblr blog is an ongoing project where we:

  1. share promising humanitarian efforts by different organisations
  2. donate the money generated from the blog (through the ads) to the relief effort in Somalia

So far, that is it! 

Thank you for this question :) I realize the blog is somewhat ambiguous; I’m working to fix that.

Posted 2 years ago / 150 notes / Via: doctorswithoutborders

doctorswithoutborders:

In 2009, a new, safe, effective drug combination for human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, was added to the World Health Organization’s Essential Medicines List— the result of an initiative led by MSF, its research and epidemiology center, Epicentre, and DNDi.
Sleeping sickness is among the world’s most neglected diseases. Affecting up to 70,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa each year, it is spread by the bite of the tsetse fly and can be fatal if not addressed. MSF teams began treating it in Uganda in 1986 and soon opened treatment programs in other affected countries.
For years, the only drug available was melarsoprol, a toxic arsenic derivative that killed 1 in 20 patients. From 2001 through 2008, Epicentre conducted research at MSF clinics in Uganda, Republic of Congo, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where a drug called eflornithine was already in use. Though an improvement over melarsoprol, eflornithine had its own onerous requirements: 56 intravenous infusions over 14 days.
MSF teams thought to combine eflornithine with another drug, nifurtimox. Trial results proved that NECT, as the combination is known, was equally effective and could be administered in just 14 infusions over 7 days. NECT was the first new treatment for sleeping sickness in 25 years. Today, the WHO provides it free of charge to Ministries of Health in affected countries, thanks to drug donations by Bayer and Sanofi-aventis, and to kits created by MSF’s logistics and supplies division. MSF continues to support sleeping sickness treatment in DRC, Central African Republic, Uganda, and South Sudan, and, overall, has treated nearly 50,000 people for the disease over the past 25 years.
Read more in the 2010 Annual Report
Photo: © Marco Baroncini/Corbis

doctorswithoutborders:

In 2009, a new, safe, effective drug combination for human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, was added to the World Health Organization’s Essential Medicines Listthe result of an initiative led by MSF, its research and epidemiology center, Epicentre, and DNDi.

Sleeping sickness is among the world’s most neglected diseases. Affecting up to 70,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa each year, it is spread by the bite of the tsetse fly and can be fatal if not addressed. MSF teams began treating it in Uganda in 1986 and soon opened treatment programs in other affected countries.

For years, the only drug available was melarsoprol, a toxic arsenic derivative that killed 1 in 20 patients. From 2001 through 2008, Epicentre conducted research at MSF clinics in Uganda, Republic of Congo, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where a drug called eflornithine was already in use. Though an improvement over melarsoprol, eflornithine had its own onerous requirements: 56 intravenous infusions over 14 days.

MSF teams thought to combine eflornithine with another drug, nifurtimox. Trial results proved that NECT, as the combination is known, was equally effective and could be administered in just 14 infusions over 7 days. NECT was the first new treatment for sleeping sickness in 25 years. Today, the WHO provides it free of charge to Ministries of Health in affected countries, thanks to drug donations by Bayer and Sanofi-aventis, and to kits created by MSF’s logistics and supplies division. MSF continues to support sleeping sickness treatment in DRC, Central African Republic, Uganda, and South Sudan, and, overall, has treated nearly 50,000 people for the disease over the past 25 years.

Read more in the 2010 Annual Report

Photo: © Marco Baroncini/Corbis

Posted 2 years ago / 34 notes / Via: peacecorps


This photo was taken in Karfigula, Burkina Faso during a camp for young girls. The camp used soccer as a tool to educate girls on HIV/AIDS. The photo shows Peace Corps Volunteer Brandon Perkins, and Burkinabe counterpart leading a group of young girls in some stretching exercises before an educational match.

This photo was taken in Karfigula, Burkina Faso during a camp for young girls. The camp used soccer as a tool to educate girls on HIV/AIDS. The photo shows Peace Corps Volunteer Brandon Perkins, and Burkinabe counterpart leading a group of young girls in some stretching exercises before an educational match.

Posted 2 years ago / 1 note
Posted 2 years ago / 18 notes / Via: cambodiankidsfoundation

cambodiankidsfoundation:

CONSTRUCTION OF SOKSAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL.

FInally the rains have started to disappear and the flood waters are beginning to back off, so the construction of our new school can continue!

Once completed the Soksan International School will edusate 2000 Khmer students, have 18 classrooms and include specialty classrooms such as art rooms, music rooms, wood work shelter etc. 

For more info check out our website : www.cambodiankidsfoundation.com

or stay in the loop via facebook : www.facebook.com/cambodiankidsfoundation

Posted 2 years ago / 19 notes / Via: goodneighborsusa

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